Teach for America

When teaching is a vocation

The belief that all children have great potential and the right to an excellent education, regardless of their origin or socioeconomic status, is what led to the creation of this organization over 28 years ago. Today, the Teach for America network includes more than 60,000 professionals that are able to confirm that education changes lives. The goal is to have a short-term impact on students, but also to convert young professionals into leaders committed to achieving equality in education.

The focus of their work consists of three parts. The first is finding leaders. The goal is to find people whose professional careers stand out and who have demonstrated their leadership skills and values. They should set a good example for the children both in and out of the classroom. This process, once the person is on board, begins with two years teaching in a public school where they will work with the children and families most affected by educational inequity.

In the second part, TFA develops and cultivates the leadership skills needed to bring about change through education. Members of the Corps (this is how the team of teachers is referred to) face the enormous challenge of giving classes in communities with high needs. This is a difficult task. Yet it allows them to have immediate impact and empower students that are then able to change their lives.

The third part deals with supporting individual and collective leadership, relationships and learning from each other. Their careers are honed with the passing of time. The students connect with each other and withopportunities that have a high individual impact in order to have a high collective impact.

Aware of the importance of education for the future of children, Fundación MAPFRE is actively participating in the Teach For America project. And it does so at several schools in the United States, providing financial support. An example is the Excel Academy in Boston, Massachusetts, where it finances the training of those who will go on to teach children from low-income communities in the city of Boston.